The epidemic — the scare that is threatening all who are dear.

The COVID-19 — What started in China as a localized, new mutation of coronavirus which causes a respiratory disease — named the COVID-19 — has reached monumental proportions, and there is barely any country that has not been affected, to date.

Sadly, we have lost a lot of people to this merciless virus. At first, we barely bothered to give it a thought, and we simply placed it there far-off in China. Mistakenly, we thought that soon we will hear the end of it, as has happened in the past several times, with other strains of the coronavirus — SARS or MERS.

Somehow, we read trending news on social media and on other platforms, and always we detach ourselves from responsibility and awareness that are key to the solution of any problem. We fail to see that we have a part to play, in every issue that concerns life on #earth.

By the time we start to participate and take action, we find that the problem has reached monumental proportions, and it is only when we are forced that we begin to really interact with the issue at hand. Sometimes, the most effective way to face an enemy is to know it. In this case, there is so much talk on the internet and on social media to the extent that people are confused about how severe the disease is and what exactly are the measures to be taken.

Information should only be taken from reliable sources, and to that end, WHO says: “We are not just fighting an epidemic; we’re fighting an infodemic.” 

An infodemic implies — the spread of incorrect information, especially online — as defined by the Macmillan dictionary.

Simply stated, we are fighting information that contributes to the scare factor that makes it more fearful than the disease itself. #COVID-19

To avoid all that, we will take advice only from the source that is responsible for all health issues globally — the WHO.

The scare of COVID-19

  • It causes a respiratory disease that could be fatal.
  • The speed with which it is spreading.
  • It has reached all regions of the world.
  • Senior citizens may not be able to fight it because their immunity is not at its best.
  • It spreads from person to person – a sneeze, a cough, dirty hands…
  • It can be transmitted in all areas – including hot and humid countries.
  • The incubation period is 1 – 14 days, usually it is 5 days.
  • The fatality rate is daunting to say the least.
  • Hospitals may not be able to meet the influx of patients.

Taking care of yourself in the simplest terms

First and foremost – social distance even among family members, friends and relatives. And, when crossing across someone then, keep at least 1.5 to 2 meters distance. No hand shaking, hugs, or kisses.

  • Wash your hands before, after, and immediately after you come in contact with any surface, person, or you have been outside.
  • Washing hands should be for 20 seconds, not less, and alcohol-based sanitizers with a content of at least 60% alcohol.
  • Avoid touching your eyes, mouth, and nose because you may have come in contact with a contaminated surface, and the virus will make its way into the body from any of those points.
  • Keep at least a meter and half from any person.
  • Avoid gatherings, for now, even family gatherings as much as possible.
  • Cover your nose and mouth when you cough and sneeze (with your bent elbow or a tissue).
  • Use a mask but wisely – only if you have to because there is a shortage.
  • Children can fight it, but they will do the most spreading so, they should be protected as much as possible.

People are dying, and the only hope to stop the spread of the virus is to reduce interactions as much as possible. Hospitals are finding it more than they can cope with to meet the influx of patients that need care, especially intensive care. That is not just in a particular country, but anywhere that the virus has attacked even in the US, as reported on the March 26, 2020.

Cases all over the world have reached a daunting half a million infections.

On the bright side, countries are joining hands — or shall we say, working together — to find solutions, and man is strong enough to deal with it. Moving forward, we will learn to work and create a more #sustainable future.

About Salwa

Salwa is a writer and author. Weaving magic with words backed up with research and a natural flair for beautiful writing.


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